California Election 2016

The Presidential Election for the United States of America is tomorrow so it’s about time I do some sort of post about it.

I usually don’t like talking about politics with people who aren’t my friends. It’s pretty much guaranteed to be divisive, but I suppose I should use my teeny soapbox of the GoCorral website for what it’s worth.

I’ve got two categories I want to go over for the election, who should be President and California’s propositions. I’ll start with the propositions. Continue reading

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July Fourth as a Kid

July 4th was on Friday which for those of you who don’t know, is Independence Day in the USA.

There was a band, picnic, games, and fireworks at a park right near my house.

I went to that with my wife and had a lot of fun.

But I don’t want to write about that today. I want to write about how I used to celebrate July 4th with my mother.

When I was a kid my mom and I always went to a fireworks celebration on July 3rd at the Frost Amphitheater on Stanford campus.

The celebration at Frost Amphitheater happened on July 3rd so that all the people that worked at it could enjoy the real holiday with their own families.

It never mattered much to my mother and me which day we were celebrating July 4th on. One day for a celebration of Independence is as good as another.

The event starts with waiting in line.

There are a few seats that you can reserve, but they were quite expensive. Most people just got lawn tickets.

Lawn tickets don’t come with assigned seating, so the earlier you get there the better your seat is.

We would sit in line for an hour or two with all our picnic stuff, baskets and coolers of food, games, pillows, blankets, etc.

Once inside we’d set up on the lawn and wait for the music to start.

When we first started going the band was usually a giant orchestra that played lots of classical music.

Later on they switched to more popular bands that people could dance to like Cherry Popping Daddies.

I liked the classical music better, but listening to the Cherry Popping Daddies got me interested more and more in swing dancing.

The concert would go on until dark and then the band would announce the fireworks coming up.

The fireworks were set off behind the amphitheater and looked like every other fireworks show.

After the explosions were over everyone packed up their stuff and left, just like every other fireworks show.

They’ve stopped doing the July 3rd event, but I’ve started missing it more and more lately.

Maybe they’ll start it up again next year!

-Mister Ed

Cartoon History

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I said in a previous post that I’m reading the Cartoon History of the Universe Part 3. Here’s the page I’m on now about Japanese civilization.

The Cartoon History series is now complete with five books. The first three are called Cartoon History of the Universe Parts 1-3 and the second two are called Cartoon History of the Modern World Parts 1-2.

The author’s name is Larry Gonick. He does a bunch of other cartoon non-fiction books as well.

I own Larry Gonick’s Cartoon Guide to Physics, Cartoon Guide to Chemistry, and his Cartoon History of the United States.

All his books are funny, informative, and quick to read. You can check out more of them at his simple website, www.larrygonick.com

I started reading the series in third grade when I was homeschooled by my parents.

Only the first two books existed then. I’ve read them cover to cover dozens of times since. This repeated reading is probably why I know so much about ancient history, but a lot less about anything after the fall of Rome.

I showed the books to my father-in-law recently because he was interested in the Roman Empire and the Holy Roman Empires.

His reaction upon flipping through them was surprise at the vast amount of sex in them.

Gonick doesn’t shy away from portraying the sexual scandals in his books. If sex between two people influenced their actions and their actions affected history, then he includes the sex.

I read the books when I was eight if that matters to anyone.

Gonick also writes a comic feature for the children’s science magazine, Muse. The magazine is written for ages 10-14.

The feature is a page comic of archetypal philosophers from different cultures talking with each other.

The philosophers also fool around and crack jokes in the margins of other articles throughout the magazine.

I’m rereading the later three Cartoon History books now so that I can fill the gaps in my natural recall of different historical periods.

I’ll probably need to reread it another dozen times before my recall of anything past 500AD is perfect, but I’m hoping that I’ll get there!

That’s all for tonight!

-Mister Ed