Moving In

PIcture was taken by the house inspector. I'm in the doorway!
This picture was taken by the house inspector. I’m in the doorway!

So where have I been the last month or so with my posts?

Moving into this brand new house of course!

Well, it’s not actually brand new. It was built in 1975, but you get the idea.

My wife and I packed up most of our stuff and her parents and then on a Saturday her parents came down to help us with everything.

Last time we’d moved I had rented the truck and driven it. Being unfamiliar with how to drive a truck resulted in me sideswiping another car while parking. No serious damage to either vehicle, but I got scared of driving something that big.

My in-laws were willing to drive it for us this time.

So we spent all of Saturday sweating and puffing as we moved all the furniture downstairs, into the truck, and inside the new house.

The hardest part was the couch. The couch is an Ikea couch and came delivered in 6 parts.

Putting those parts together was an extremely annoying experience that I wasn’t looking forward to repeating so I convinced my relatives that we could get it out of the house without taking it apart.

I turned out to be just barely right about this. We turned the couch on its side and even then it barely fit through the door. Grappling it down the stairs was an art form.

We were tempted to tip it over the side of the banister halfway down the stairs and be done with it, but we resisted.

Eventually we got the thing down the stairs and into the truck.

Moving it into the new house was much easier. A ground floor entrance and double doors helped that process a lot.

We’re now about a month away from that Saturday and have mostly moved in. More stories to come! Hopefully I can get my act together and keep posting here with some regularity.

 

-GoCorral

Solar Freaking Roadways

My wife showed me this cool new technology called Solar Roadways this morning.

She showed me with a Youtube video you can look at here.

The technology is a new type of pavement made out of solar panels.

The video describes it quite well in a funny way (Solar Freaking Roadways!).

Solar panels cover the road. On top of the panels are a few LED lights and then a strong shield of glass.

The glass can support up to 250,000 pound (113,000kg) trucks. The inventor of Solar Roadways, Scott Brusaw, chose that researched weight because the transportation of oil refinery equipment is done at weights of around 230,000 pounds (104,000kg).

The LEDs are used to create lane lines or for other necessary road paint (Pedestrian Xing, Slow Down, etc.).

If every paved surface in the USA were covered with these panels they would generate three times the current energy consumption of the USA.

Other energy sources would still be needed as solar panels don’t operate at night.

The panels can also heat themselves to melt snow and prevent dangerous driving conditions in colder states.

Two underground channels are planned to run along side the Roadway. One will hold water runoff. The other will hold electrical wires.

The wires carry the electricity off the solar panels to consumers.

The channel could also hold telephone lines, fiberoptic internet cables, etc. By placing them underground, storms are less likely to cause outages.

Mr. Brusaw, pictured above in a tractor on the prototype driveway of Solar Roadways, seemed particularly proud of the traction of Solar Roadways.

Some people worry that cars won’t be able to stop on glass, but Solar Roadways glass panels are textured in a way that cars going 80mph (130kph) on a wet panel could stop just as fast as on wet asphalt.

My worry upon seeing the giant textured panels was that bikes would not be able to go on them.

Fortunately, Mr. Brusaw has an answer for that too. Another variety of the panels has a smoother texture that bikes can ride over comfortably.

The smoother texture allows cars to stop in times similar to wet asphalt at speeds of only 40mph (65kph) though. You can’t have everything.

It would be easy enough to build a bike lane out of the smoother panels next to a road made of the textured panels to accommodate both types of vehicles.

If you’re interested in learning more about Solar Roadways you can check out their website or fund them using Indiegogo. The fundraiser is until June 20th 2014.

-Mister Ed