Programming + Absence

Well it’s Friday and I’ve about missed my chance of having a D&D post this week.

I started writing one and I just kept adding more to it. The consequence is no post about Cimmeria this week, but hopefully a giant sized one for next week!

If you’re still craving your weekly D&D post from the GoCorral blog then I still have something for you.

I completed that script I was working on for criticals in Hackmaster on Roll20. Not only that, I completed two more scripts for melee and ranged fumbles in Hackmaster!

They are available for download on GitHub at these locations:
Critical: https://gist.github.com/GoCorral/1297d794e80e78f6238e2bd6c7661e37
Melee Fumble: https://gist.github.com/GoCorral/9240004810d0667c5ac76a083d7a94d3
Ranged Fumble: https://gist.github.com/GoCorral/f0fd318795fdf76643cfd0b2e0908c5f

So if you play Hackmaster using Roll20 and have a Roll20 Pro subscription then these should be pretty valuable to you. If not… you might be able to modify it for use outside of Roll20’s API and still get some fun out of it.

The other announcement of the week is that I will be on vacation the next two weeks.

I’ll do my best to stay constant with updates over that time, but I believe it is inevitable that I’ll be distracted by something in the city in visiting, Nashville.

And when I get back I’ll have a lot to say about the capitol of country music!

Thanks for reading!
-GoCorral

Roll20 and D&D

I’ve mentioned Roll20 in past posts about how my group plays D&D, but I figure it deserves a post all its own.

Roll20 was a Kickstarter project back in 2012. It raised $39,651, well past its goal of $5,000.

Once funded the project team set out to create a free and simple way to play D&D and other roleplaying games online.

They created something that has been dubbed a virtual tabletop (VTT). D&D is normally played at a table, so when you play online everyone sits at their computers around the virtual tabletop.

What does that actually mean though?

First, Roll20 transmits your voice, video, and any typed messages you want to the other people you’re playing with. Continue reading

The Fault in Our Stars Movie

I saw the Fault in Our Stars movie this weekend and I was a little disappointed.

It’s an excellent adaptation of the book and is a solid movie on its own.

I just couldn’t help comparing every little detail in the movie to the book.

So many small things had to be cut out and I missed everyone of them.

Charlotte is missing, Mr. Van Houten doesn’t play Bomfalleralla in Hazel’s car, the subtle clues of Augustus condition are all gone, the voice in the Anne Frank house is “Anne Frank’s” instead of Otto Frank’s, etc.

I’m sure this happens all the time with movie adaptations of books, but this was the first time I really noticed it.

I think that’s partially due to the amount of time between when I read the book and saw the movie.

For Fault in Our Stars there were less than two weeks between reading the book and seeing the movie.

Other movies of books that I’ve seen were usually a year or more between when I read the book and saw the movie (Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, Hornblower).

There are errors and missing parts when I look back on those movies, but I don’t care as much about them.

My sister has the same problem for the Harry Potter books, but for a different reason.

Because the books are so good, she’s read them several times. Enough that she’s memorized all those little details.

So when the movies are missing parts, it feels wrong to her. It feels like its not Harry Potter.

Same thing happened for me with Fault in Our Stars.

The movie is great, but it is not EXACTLY the same as the book.

I do recommend the movie and the book as well, but try to keep them separated by at least a month to avoid this problem from happening to you too!

That’s all for tonight.

-Mister Ed