Mother’s Day

The cookies I made over Mother's Day weekend with my step-mom.
The cookies I made over Mother’s Day weekend with my step-mom.

 

I went home for Mother’s Day to spend it with my step-mom.

The plan was to bake snickerdoodles and watch a movie together.

My mother-in-law lives in the same town so my wife came along and spent the day with her.

We’d come in Saturday. We got up early on Sunday at my parents’ house to head over to my wife’s parents’ house.

We had to get there early as my mother-in-law wanted to go to church.

She used to go to church every week as the music director for her church, but that eventually was too much stress for her.

She stopped doing the music program and is now more of a “two day Christian” (Christmas and Easter), at least for going to church. She’s still very much a Christian at home.

I always like going to church with her, but I can’t bring myself to go every week in my hometown without knowing what the churches are actually like.

After church my wife went to spend the day with her mom while I went home to spend the day with mine.

My step-mom and I chatted a lot, played Quiddler (a card version of Scrabble if you’ve never played), made snickerdoodles, had pizza for dinner, and watched A Fish Called Wanda.

At the end of all that my wife still wasn’t finished with her activities of hiking, making Indian food, eating the Indian food, and chatting.

My parents recommended a movie for my wife and I to watch together called Notting Hill.

We decided to preview the first bit of the movie to make sure my wife would like it before I left to pick her up.

The first half hour was pretty good and I think my wife and I will like watching it together.

I went and got her from her parents’ house. Her mom always has to take a picture whenever we’re over, so we submitted ourselves to the camera’s gaze before leaving.

I drove the two hours back in the dark and we ended up in bed by 11.

And that was my Mother’s Day!

-Mister Ed

Dawn of Worlds

The cover on the 12 page PDF of the rules for Dawn of Worlds
The cover on the twelve page PDF of the rules for Dawn of Worlds.

Dawn of Worlds is an interesting game my friends and I have played a few times. The rules can be found at the website of Legends, the creator, if you’re interested.

Most games have a set goal to win the game. Having all the money in Monopoly, having the highest score in Scrabble, getting all your pawns home in Sorry, etc.

Dawn of Worlds is… different.

The game was designed not to be competitive or even really to be fun. The goal of the game is to create a fantasy world as a setting for a novel or a roleplaying campaign world.

My friends and I used this to create the world for our next campaign.

How does the game work? It’s really simply actually.

Each turn you get 2d6 points to spend on the world. There are ways to get bonus points as well.

The points are used to add things to the world or to influence already existing entities in the world. I can use my points to add a mountain range. On my next turn I could also use my points to infest the mountain range with dragons.

Everyone else is using their points to create or change things in the world as well.

The game has three ages. Different actions cost different amounts during the different ages.

The first age makes creating terrain features cheap and makes other actions expensive. You’re supposed to be building the physical world at this point.

The second age makes creating races and cities cheap. You build up a civilization during this age.

The third age makes changing races and cities cheap. The game encourages conflict between the players at this point.

The third age is probably the most interesting due to the conflict between parts, but this conflict is different than other games.

In Scrabble I fight with my opponent for the triple word score bonuses at the edge of the board.

In Dawn of Worlds, the conflicts aren’t really about having my civilization “win.” I just want a more interesting story for the game.

I found myself most often in conflict with one of my buddies whose internet name is Throgg. He developed a civilization of humans while I developed dwarves.

Throughout the whole game the humans and the dwarves fought. In the end neither side won the war, it was still ongoing when we ended the game.

Why would we end the game with the conflict unresolved?

Because that was the point! Now when we play D&D within the world there are issues threatening the peace and security of the world. Issues that our characters can attempt to solve, avoid, or survive.

Will our characters try to end the conflict between the dwarves and humans? Will they try to repel the undead scourge coming out of the north? Will they journey into the southern jungles looking for the first civilizations of the bird people?

We could eventually do all these things over a series of different campaigns. But Dawn of Worlds allowed us to create a world together with a history that we all know and had some impact on.

Gurutama is the name of the world we created. I think we’ll enjoy playing in Gurutama much more than in any other campaign world because it’ll no longer be a world where only the DM has the full picture. Now everyone will have some input.

I plan on posting more about Gurutama for awhile. The basics of the world were fleshed out in our playing of Dawn of Worlds, but there are many specifics to still fill in. I’m going to use this blog as a tool for writing down those specifics and getting input from the general public as well if there is any input to give.

That’s all for now!

-Mister Ed