Warband Streaming

Steam had their usual Halloween sale and I snatched up a game I’d been watching for when it went on sale, Mount and Blade: Warband.

I wrote a review of the original Mount and Blade game back in March 2014. While my review was positive, I felt like after two playthroughs that I was done with the game and probably finished with any sequels as well.

To be fair those two playthroughs were massive in length and I didn’t want to get any sequels because I felt the gameplay wouldn’t be any different. Kind of like how I’ve only played the first two generations of the Pokemon games. I caught all 250 already, dammit! I don’t need anymore!

But eventually the call of a game I loved so much becomes too strong… My mind says, “You know you want it. And its on sale. Its only $10. You can get it.” And my mind forgets to mention that the real cost of a game for me isn’t the money, but the time I spend playing it instead of doing other things.

I usually play Mount and Blade when I’m by myself, so what other things could I do by myself that I’d be missing out on by not playing? I could read, watch something on Youtube or Netflix, draw, write something, stream a video game on Twitch-

Wait! What was that last one? I could stream a video game on Twitch you say?

Well, why not stream Mount and Blade?

I’ve been doing that and it’s tons of fun!

I’m exploring more of the mods for Warband. I’ve been learning more about tech trees and trading within the game. I’ve found other people who play it (Finally!). All around I’ve been having a blast replaying it. I even got my wife to play it for a minute which is a rare thing indeed.

I’ve been streaming in the morning on weekends and I plan to do a little more during the week as well. You can catch me at http://www.twitch.tv/gocorral

-Mister Ed

The Fault in Our Stars

I read The Fault in Our Stars next to my cat, Carmelita.
I read The Fault in Our Stars next to my cat, Carmelita.

This weekend I read a popular young adult fiction book, The Fault in Our Stars by John Green.

The book is written from the point of view of Hazel, a teenager with lung cancer (15% survival rate, likely higher for her specific case) who is always hooked up to a respirator.

She begins attending a support group for teenagers with cancer. At the support group she meets Isaac and his friend, Augustus.

Hazel begins dating Augustus, who has a a less lethal type of cancer than her (osteosarcoma, 80% survival rate).

The book explores how teenagers react to their own terminal illnesses, how their families and friends react, and what a cancer patient might want to be remembered for.

One of Hazel’s struggles is that she doesn’t want to only be known for having cancer.

She loves poetry and reading. The book acknowledges that she is even smart enough to be attending community college for some type of English degree.

Unfortunately, all of Hazel’s friends from before cancer only see her as a sick person, not someone who loves literature.

Sick of pity from her old friends, Hazel has withdrawn from public life and only interacts with her family and her new friends from the support group who personally understand her illness.

Hazel also withdraws because “she is a grenade.”

She fears her eventual death and doesn’t want to hurt anyone who gets attached to her. Thus, she avoids making such attachments.

I’d definitely recommend the book. It’s a quick read, well written if predictable, and on a topic worth learning more about.

There’s also a movie adaption coming out on June 6th 2014 in the USA. The book wasn’t enough, so I’ll be going to the movie to get more even if the story is the same.

I’ll probably check out more of John Green’s work too.

-Mister Ed

Candles

Here's the right side of my desk with some movies, a candle, my armchair, and a world map.
Here’s the right side of my desk with some movies, a candle, my armchair, and a world map.

I’ve been reading this book lately that suggests lighting candles to focus.

I read several books at a time. I hop between each book as I go. I once read a book over three years because I kept hopping between it and dozens of others.

Right now I’m reading The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin, The Cartoon History of the Universe Part 3 by Larry Gonick, and The Anabasis of Alexander by Arrian.

The last book is the most interesting of them. It’s an ancient history of Alexander the Great written around 100AD, 400 years after Alexander died.

Anabasis is the Greek word for a journey with an element of conquest/violence. The best translation I’ve come up with is incursion for this specific usage. Alexander invades Persia and continues further and further east until his troops mutiny and he is forced to retreat from India.

Anyways, those candle things. I got a few to try them out.

Can’t say it helped me focus very much. The Happiness Project recommended scented candles, and the one I’m using has only a very faint scent.

I’m not used to scented candles. My family AND my inlaws don’t use them due to allergies. The scent just makes us sneeze.

It’s a nice idea though. I think I’ll try it again sometime.

I’ll need more matches though. I’ve only got two tiny match books. With electric stoves, I’ve never light anything in my apartment until the candle thing.

If you’re interested in The Happiness Project the author, Gretchen Rubin, has a blog of her own by the same name. Check it out at www.gretchenrubin.com

That’s all for tonight!

-Mister Ed