Mo’nyoq

Mo’nyoq is a small settlement on the southern coast of the Aral Sea. The town’s people are composed of 3,000 refugees from the Second Alliance War and growing all the time. Danar and Amalius founded the town after the war to provide homes and jobs for the thousands displaced from Bradel Fields, Greshen Dale, and Phoenix, among others. Danar has taken the lead on running the town while Amalius manages the administration of Jipangu and the Second Alliance. When Danar is called away, Amalius’s squire, Endi, takes over.

The basic necessities of Mo’nyoq are still under construction. Smithy, granary, town hall, and walls, as well as a reliable supply of food and water. The need for food has brought the people of Mo’nyoq into conflict with the indigenous orc and goblin populations. The locals are experts at fishing the Aral Sea, so Mo’nyoq relies on their cooperation, willing or not, to survive. Food is brought in from the west as well, but the supply lines suffer attacks from bandits and other monsters, making that resource unreliable. While Mo’nyoq is supported from the outside the citizens are building a fishing fleet and sowing their fields with grain for future years.

The people of Mo’nyoq come from all over Cimmeria, but the majority are humans from Eastern Cimmeria. Coming from a range of different cities, the locals have little in common besides their current situation. The settlement is a melting pot of cultures, cuisines, and social rules. As the city develops its own identity, arguments are common but so too are unions of unusual pairings. As a young settlement, Mo’nyoq is unique in having few children present. Many of the colonists either have none or left them in the care of relatives in other locations. This has created an adult or vulgar atmosphere in Mo’nyoq.

Mo’nyoq is named after a real city, Mo’ynoq, previously on the south coast of the Aral Sea. Irrigation canals did by the Soviets have led to the almost complete destruction of the Aral Sea. While Mo’ynoq was once a fishing town on the south coast it is now a site of disaster tourism about a hundred miles from the Aral Sea’s receding coast line.

Aral Sea in 1989 (left) and 2014 (right)