Online Videos and Copyright

Public domain music is a mystery to me.
Public domain music is a mystery to me.

I’ve been thinking about including music on my streams and Youtube channel.

There’s just this problem of what music I’m able to include.

I want to play my typical playlists that I listen to on my own.

But all that stuff is copyrighted!

I can’t play The Beatles, Elvis, or Johnny Cash. I can’t play the modern stuff I like like Katy Perry, Ke$ha, or Barenaked Ladies. Not without getting slapped by a copyright notice.

Youtube has software that searches a video when its uploaded for copyrighted music.

If Youtube finds copyrighted music, it plays an ad before the video. The revenue from the ad goes toward the owner of the music.

Additionally a link to iTunes appears below the video so that someone can buy the music played in the song.

I couldĀ live with that eventually, but when I setup my Youtube channel I was looking forward to the possibility of making money off of it. If I use copyrighted music, then the ad revenue goes to the owner of the music instead of to me.

One of my ideas was to play music while streaming and then using editing software to eliminate the music from the audio track.

I have a theory for how I could do that, but I’m not confident that it will work successfully.

If I can’t get that to work then I either can’t play music during my streams, or I can’t profit directly from uploading clips of my Twitch streams to Youtube.

A separate problem that I hadn’t considered is whether its legal to play copyrighted music while streaming.

I’d need to relook at Twitch’s license agreement that I barely skimmed when I first agreed to it.

If it turns out that I’m not allowed to play stuff there then only one option remains for playing music on my Twitch and Youtube channels.

Public domain music.

I have close to zero experience with public domain music and no idea how I’ll find stuff that I will like or that will be appropriate.

I’m willing to give it a shot though!

-Mister Ed

Worms and Introns

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I have two jobs right now. One of them is an internship working on introns.

Introns are part of your genes, but they’re a strange part.

Imagine your genes are like a TV show. There are parts you watch and there are the commercials that you mute or ignore.

When the TV show comes out on DVD or Netflix the commercials are removed.

Genes are split up into watchable parts and commercials too. The watchable parts are called exons and the commercials are called introns.

When DNA makes RNA the introns are removed from the code, just like when a TV show is released on DVD the commercials are removed.

For a while scientists thought that introns did nothing for the genetic code of an organism. Introns were just useless DNA trash.

That changed in the late 1980s when some introns were found to enhance the expression of genes.

Some genes have what are called enhancing introns that increase the expression of that gene. This is called intron mediated enhancement (IME).

If you take an enhancing intron from one gene and put it into another, then the other gene will create more RNA and thus more proteins as well.

So enhancing introns increase expression of a gene, but not much is known about why. The lab I work in is one of the few that studies this process to try and figure out the specifics.

Most intron research right now is done in plants. I’m trying to extend that research to animals by using worms.

The worms I use are called C. elegans. They’re only 1mm long and are commonly used for research projects around the globe.

My lab previously discovered that enhancing introns in plants work best near the beginning of a gene.

My project is to see if the same holds true for C. elegans.

I’ll also be looking at whether an intron that is enhancing in plants is also enhancing when out into a gene in C. elegans.

That’s all for now!

-Mister Ed