Birthday Dinner Party at M.Y. China

Martin Yan is the older guy on the left. He sat next to my wife! Eeeeee! *faints*
Martin Yan is the older guy on the left. He sat next to my wife! Eeeeee! *faints*

I went to a birthday party for a friend at a restaurant called M.Y. China.

At first I was sketpical as the restaurant is inside a mall in San Francisco.

Once we got there my face lit up and I got really excited. There was a sign out front of the restaurant that said, “Head chef Martin Yan is personally in the restaurant tonight.”

Martin Yan is a famous Chinese chef who’s hosted cooking shows for the last 30 years. He’s also written cookbooks, one of which I’ve bought in the past.

So M.Y. China isn’t some weird way of spelling My China. It’s “Martin Yan China!”

I got even more excited once we got in the restaurant because apparently the birthday girl’s dad is Martin Yan’s dentist. She is the dental hygienist who cleans his kid’s teeth when they go to the dentist.

Because of that we got a personal visit to our table from Martin Yan and some pictures! And when he talked to the table he put his hand on my back. I got touched by a famous person! Oh Boy!

The food was obviously excellent. We got a bunch of different dishes to share.

There was an amazing tofu dish in a thick soy sauce. There was sweet and sour pork. The pork was breaded like usual, but with something with the texture of bacon included in the breading.

There were scissor cut noodles with soy sauce covering them.

There was rice with soy sauce. That really pointed out to me how good the soy sauce was. It included peppers in it or something to make it taste way better than the normal Kikkoman soy sauce that everyone else uses.

There were sea food dumplings with peppers on top of them as well.

My mouth is watering while writing this. Unfortunately, I’m not a food critic so I can’t do the restaurant justice in this post. The food was amazing.

There were plenty of other dishes, but sadly not very many vegetarian ones. My wife got to eat some rice with spicy green beans. The green beans were good, but not as extraordinary as everything else at the restaurant.

Overall a great restaurant with great food!

-Mister Ed

Cartoon History

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I said in a previous post that I’m reading the Cartoon History of the Universe Part 3. Here’s the page I’m on now about Japanese civilization.

The Cartoon History series is now complete with five books. The first three are called Cartoon History of the Universe Parts 1-3 and the second two are called Cartoon History of the Modern World Parts 1-2.

The author’s name is Larry Gonick. He does a bunch of other cartoon non-fiction books as well.

I own Larry Gonick’s Cartoon Guide to Physics, Cartoon Guide to Chemistry, and his Cartoon History of the United States.

All his books are funny, informative, and quick to read. You can check out more of them at his simple website, www.larrygonick.com

I started reading the series in third grade when I was homeschooled by my parents.

Only the first two books existed then. I’ve read them cover to cover dozens of times since. This repeated reading is probably why I know so much about ancient history, but a lot less about anything after the fall of Rome.

I showed the books to my father-in-law recently because he was interested in the Roman Empire and the Holy Roman Empires.

His reaction upon flipping through them was surprise at the vast amount of sex in them.

Gonick doesn’t shy away from portraying the sexual scandals in his books. If sex between two people influenced their actions and their actions affected history, then he includes the sex.

I read the books when I was eight if that matters to anyone.

Gonick also writes a comic feature for the children’s science magazine, Muse. The magazine is written for ages 10-14.

The feature is a page comic of archetypal philosophers from different cultures talking with each other.

The philosophers also fool around and crack jokes in the margins of other articles throughout the magazine.

I’m rereading the later three Cartoon History books now so that I can fill the gaps in my natural recall of different historical periods.

I’ll probably need to reread it another dozen times before my recall of anything past 500AD is perfect, but I’m hoping that I’ll get there!

That’s all for tonight!

-Mister Ed