Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 21

Previous: Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 20

Another transitionary period post where no major events really happen, but there’s plenty of minor events! The Bwarloran Dwarves are kicked out of Halusho Forest, but they haven’t been a major player since they created the Hobgoblins. We do have the creation of Proaxium which will come to play a large role in future events (The Profiteers play a role in those events as well). I was the one who had the idea for Proaxium because previously there was no single location identified as a center of knowledge. Najar and its associated cities have a good school system, but Proaxium is the place to go for advanced education. And of course the Hykman League is growing.

Another thing to notice in this post is the drastic reduction in time scale. I’m only able to cover a 5 year period in the post because events get closer together in the third age of Dawn of Worlds and because we started to have more interesting events to fill those years.

699 NA: Trade relations expanded over the new human world. Allies and enemies were quickly made and lost as every city and organization vied for control of the old Empire. A new organization splintered off from the shadowy Brotherhood of the Living Immolation. This new organization, the Frugal Profiteers, sought to control all wealth within the Maw. They no longer cared about the resurrection of Navillus or the Najar Empire. All that mattered to the Profiteers was power. The Profiteers secretly bought up many of the mercenary companies used in the wars between the human cities. They installed Profiteer members as the leaders of the mercenaries and awaited the right time to strike.

The Merfolk and Bwarlor dominated the sea trade network that established itself across the Maw while the Hykmans controlled the Eastern Maw’s land trade and slowly worked their way into the sea trade.

700 NA: The Metal Dwarves sensed that the Shadow Lord had been shut away in his tomb. They read through the Books once more, searching for what they must do. Perhaps now the world was ripe for civilization. The Dwarves edited portions of the Book to recognize threats from outside the normal cycle. They would have to do things differently this time and they hoped for better luck in the next cycle.

The Metal Dwarves set up an outpost to teach the world the Dwarven way. Using their vast ingenuity, they built a stone island paradise in the mouth of the Maw, south of Cyflenwi. The Kenracktopar resurfaced from their ancient isolation and built schools, roads, and aqueducts aplenty upon the new land. The island and the city of great learning built upon it were known as Proaxium.

The Merfolk, upset by this brazen annexation of their land in the Maw, sent delegates to the Dwarves to resolve the matter peacefully. The Dwarves stalled the delegates with regulation, fanciful tours of Proaxium, and, if all else failed, bribes.

In the Upper Maw, the wars between the cities continued with Syluk often gaining the upper hand.

701 NA: The Hobgoblin population constantly grew. There was no real organization, only constant pressure outwards. Ancient magic protected Crodolan, The Homestone Bridge was warded, and the sea and the mountains surrounded the Hobgoblin tribes. The only open place to destroy was Shianosoth. More and more Hobgoblins began congregating around the city and eventually they came smashing down upon it. The Bwarloran Dwarves attempted to control the Hobgoblins with pleas of fraternity and alliance against the Metal Dwarves, but their cries went unheeded. The city was burned and looted. Few Bwarloran Dwarves escaped the destruction.

703 NA: After seeing the mercantile benefits of the Hykman League firsthand, the Elves of Rotandean joined the League. They built a beautiful forest garden paradise within Hykma to celebrate their new friends. The Elven Gardens became the center of commerce and politics within Hykma and by extension for all the Eastern Maw. However, this was only for the upper class. The lower class cultural center remained in Domicilius. Class tensions heightened after the building of the Gardens. The poor saw the picturesque trees and waterfalls as a symbol of wealthy oppression.

Despite repeated requests from Hykma to join the League, Farpoint continued to remain independent of the Hykman League, maintaining their own laws, culture, and army.

-Mister Ed

Next: Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 22

Favorite Books

There’s this thing going around Facebook over the past couple weeks that finally reached me. No, not the Ice Bucket Challenge. I’m talking about a list of your top ten books.

Someone posts on their timeline and tags you in it. The copy and pasted section of the status reads:

“In your status, list 10 books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t think too hard. They don’t have to be the ‘right’ books or great books of literature, just ones that affected you in some way. Tag 10(ish) friends including me so I can see your list.”

I got tagged by my sister and here is my list:

Hyperion – Dan Simmons
Game of Thrones – George Martin
Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkein
Shade’s Children – Garth Nix
1984 – George Orwell
Dark Prince – Russell Moon
The Iron Ring – Lloyd Alexander
Nine Princes in Amber – Roger Zelazny
Gates of Fire – Steven Pressfield
Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams

Obviously there are a lot of great books that I can think of that I didn’t include on here. Dune and Harry Potter for example.

I felt the list was supposed to be composed somewhat impulsively, so I stuck with what I first thought of.

So why did I pick these?

Hyperion is possibly one of the best space opera novels ever written. Dan Simmons is an excellent writer in nearly every genre. The story follows seven travelers in a space ship on a pilgrimage to the fictional Hyperion planet where a great monster, the Shrike, awaits them. The Shrike will grant a wish to one of the travelers and kill the other six. The travelers spend their voyage telling stories like in The Canterbury Tales (every story where characters sit around and tell stories now officially based off of Canterbury Tales). The stories focus on the travelers’ past lives and why they are going to get a wish. I put Hyperion on this list because it was the first book that made me realize I love fragmented stories. Like in TV shows where there’s an A plot and a B plot. I love that in books as well. Hyperion has three sequels that I’ve read as well, Fall of Hyperion, Endymion, and Rise of Endymion.

Game of Thrones is the latest craze. I got into the series right before book 5 came out and consumed them at a rate of about one book per month. They’re good, they’re sexy, and they’re one of my favorite genres, medieval fantasy. Plus, it has a fragmented story line! Perfect!

Lord of the Rings is also a great book. My dad spent years reading me bits and pieces as bedtime stories. We started with The Hobbit when I was six and didn’t finish until I was eleven. The Lord of the Rings also inspired my favorite hobby, Dungeons and Dragons. So this one’s got too amazing things going for it. AND FRAGMENTED ACTION  ONCE AGAIN!

Shade’s Children was my first dystopia book. It’s fairly awful as far as complex themes go. Some robots from an alternate dimension invade Earth and start hunting humans for sport. The humans hide underground, but their society is kept alive by the robots or something? Sounds like a Matrix ripoff. Still, I loved it. Also, I was eight around the time I read it and there is the barest hint of sex in the book. I’m pretty sure it was my first exposure to sex, so it is significant for that reason as well.

1984 is the quintessential dystopian novel. Also, its by Orwell who is an amazing author. I loved this book and I still love it. I love the genre. Putting Shade’s Children on my list reminded me of 1984 so I put it on as well. Like I said, I didn’t think much about the list.

Dark Prince is probably one of the weirder ones on this list. It is the last book in a trilogy. The first book is called Witch Boy. The author, Russell Moon, has only written one other book. I’m not sure why he stopped writing because his stuff is quite good (or at least I remember it being good). The book tells the story of a teenage boy who suddenly discovers he is a witch and accidentally kills his girlfriend with his newfound magical powers. He then discovers that she was part of some weird witch cult which plans to use him in a plot to take over the world or something. My memory of the book is hazy, but I do remember loving it at the time.

The Iron Ring is a story that imitates Indian fairy tales. My dad read Grimm’s Fairy Tales to me when I was a kid and I loved them.  This was a continuation of that, but in an entirely different way. The stories were vaguely familiar because they used the same themes, plot devices, and stock characters, but they were also very different due to the setting for the story. Rajas instead of kings. Rakshasas instead of the Devil. It was really cool!

Nine Princes in Amber is amazing and everyone should read it. The book is the first in a series of ten books split into two halves of five books. The series details a titanic struggle between order and chaos across all dimensions. The center of order is called Amber. The series is extremely well written. One of my favorite parts is how Zelazny handles sexual or crude stuff in the books. He always alludes, but never mentions stuff explicitly. A character curses instead of “He exclaimed, ‘Shit!'” It’s very well done and I’d recommend it to everyone as long as you don’t require female characters. There aren’t very many of them…

Gates of Fire is a historical novel about the Greek defense of the Hot Gates of Thermopylae from the Persians. The story is stunningly realistic. The Spartans fight until their swords, spears, and shields are broken. All that’s left is their hands and they fight on against the Persians. I’ve always loved reading and learning more about the ancient Greeks and Romans. This novel gave me a means to do that in a more mature way.

Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy always makes me laugh. I loved the books and they are one of the few novels that I have read more than once. A few of the others on this list are also in that exalted category. The book is absurdist humor in a space opera setting, both of which appeal to me greatly. The Hitchhiker’s Guide was originally a radio show which I own a recording of and listen to occasionally in the car. If you like absurdist humor you should check it out!

Let me know what your ten would be in the comments!

-Mister Ed