Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 6

Previous: Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 5

This section of the timeline contains one of the more poetic passages about an event that fundamentally altered Gurutama’s progression.

Unfortunately, my new philosophy of removing such flowery passages continues. The passage will be retained in the Original Timeline page and I will also attempt to work it into later posts about the religions and cultures of Gurutama.

So let’s get into the dawning of the modern age of Gurutama, The Najar Ascension (Or for the enlightened, the Navillus Ascension).

1 NA: On the summer solstice an earthquake shook the entire world of Gurutama. People across the world suffered terrible nightmares and saw horrifying prophetic visions. The volcanic peak at the heart of the Red Mountains came alive belching dark smoke into the heavens. The leaders of the scattered human communities gathered to pay homage to what had come. They crept through hollowed out caverns to the core of the volcano. There they watched in terrified silence as an impossible being arose from the writhing magma. These humbled men witnessed the world-birth of the Soul Drinker, Navillus the Demon God, The Black Prince of Gorgoth, the whirling realm of malice, chaos, and unkempt cruelty.

In the blackness beneath the shuddering mountain he spoke to them. He offered them dark secrets of power and control over all the mortal realm… for a price. All but one of the human chieftains swore themselves to the Black Prince. The barbarian king, Bwolark Bwolo, the sovereign of the Skull-Dog clan, turned his back on the Soul Drinker, proclaiming that the Skull-Dogs honored no being above the legacy of their fathers and their fathers’ fathers.

3 NA: The Kenracktopar sensed the demon’s entrance into the world through a slight pull on their rings. Dwarven scouts traveled out to the human lands. Only a few returned, reporting cruel barbarism beyond even the descriptions of the Books of Legend. Something went wrong with this cycle of the world. Navillus broke into the world from the outside, so the cycle was broken. The Books held no information on how to stop this abomination. The dwarves improvised a plan. They would unite the other races of the land against the Demon Prince.

12 NA: The sacrilege of mighty Bwolark was short lived. He rallied other lesser clans whose heroes had been unfit to bear audience to the birth of Navillus. The ensuing civil war ravaged the Valley beneath the Red Peaks. Empowered by their new patron, fanaticism swept through the rest of humankind and they broke like waves on the armies of Bwolark, driving him back from the mountains and into the sea. At last Bwolark the Unbent gathered his people and sailed out into the Maw to settle on the islands therein.

30 NA: Shattered by the civil war that purified the Valley beneath the Red Peaks, humankind reforged itself in the fires of Navillus. By his blessing the Brotherhood of the Living Immolation was formed to spread his word and lead the scattered clans into a new age. By their work and his word, humanity was recast into a unified force: the Najar, an empire destined to rule the world. The old chiefs that had witnessed the world-birth took control of the new empire and founded the Quintet, five magnificent cities, to share and balance power: the Holy City of Najar, the twin ports of Alixria and Alrdia, the fortress city of Syluk in the western mountains, and Farpoint in the shadow of Mount Solorum.

34 NA: After meticulously preparing themselves for war the finest men and women of the dwarven clans gathered at Golden Mach. There they were sent on ships to Drolfo’s Cove and then Rontu-Aru. If the avians and merfolk could unite against the Living Immolation, then hope still remained.

-Mister Ed

Next: Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 7

Jordan Davis Case

One of my friends posted this on Facebook today.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/wp/2014/02/17/no-justice-for-jordan-davis-more-worry-for-parents-of-black-children/

I found it pretty interesting. I followed the Trayvon Martin case and this one is very similar. A young black teenager is killed in supposed self defense. The court system supposedly commits errors. And the accused walks away.

Of course both cases are more complex than that. In the Martin/Zimmerman case the justice system did commit errors. The police checked Martin’s body for signs of drug use, but conducted no such tests for Zimmerman. The police also let Zimmerman walk free for a month after the killing based only on his own word that it was in self defense. The police most likely did this because Martin was black and Zimmerman was not.

I do believe the correct verdict was reached in the Martin/Zimmerman case. The physical evidence reported clearly shows that Zimmerman was attacked. Zimmerman had several injuries while Martin had one. Zimmerman stated that Martin saw Zimmerman’s gun and that Martin then said, “I’m going to kill you.” If that was true, then stand your ground laws would certainly apply. The incident would not have happened if Zimmerman had not profiled Martin as a troublemaker, but that doesn’t excuse Martin’s decision to attack Zimmerman and threaten to kill him.

The Jordan Davis case suffers from the same problem of racially profiling the deceased. Dunn clearly saw Davis and his friends as “thugs” because of their race.

Let’s talk about the word “thug” for a minute. I haven’t experienced the word’s usage myself that much in my sheltered suburban life, but it is beginning to have the same racial connotations as nigger. When used in an offensive way thug will almost always mean a young black man who is making too much noise, carrying a weapon, selling drugs, etc. Any crime in a neighborhood will be explained away, “Oh, the thugs did it.” Meaning that the young black men did it.

So when Dunn calls Davis and his friends thugs, he’s already setting himself up as the committer of a hate crime. Davis and his friends were playing loud rap music at a convenience store. Dunn got out of his car and told them to turn it down. A reasonable enough request. They did and he went in to shop. Upon coming out they turned the music back up, presumable thinking he wouldn’t mind as he was leaving. He told them to turn it down again and they refused.

This is where the witness reports conflict. Dunn said that he saw a shotgun stick out the window of Davis’ car. No one else saw that. None of Davis’ friends saw that. Dunn’s wife didn’t see that. No one in the convenience store saw that. No shotgun was found in the car and none of the Davis’ friends owned one that mysteriously went missing. Dunn reacted to the imaginary shotgun by grabbing his pistol from his glovebox and firing on the teens before driving away. Davis was killed and his three friends drove away fearing for their lives. Dunn turned himself into the police soon afterward.

The trial just concluded and Dunn was found guilty of attempted second degree murder for Davis’ three friends. A mistrial was declared on a first degree murder charge for the killing of Davis. In order to deliver a verdict in a murder case, the jury must be unanimous, but they apparently weren’t for the murder of Davis. This isn’t particularly unusual. I imagine that it is very stressful to decide cases of life and death as a juror. The prosecution is appealing the case.

My personal opinion, Dunn is not guilty of first degree murder. He’s guilty of second degree murder. First degree murder is premeditated. Second degree murder is committed in the moment. The state views first degree murder as worse because most people will not choose to kill someone after thinking about it.

Did Dunn think about killing Davis? I seriously doubt that. Additional evidence makes it clear that Dunn hated black people, but he no evidence suggests that he went to that convenience store with the intent of killing someone. He went there to get some wine and chips. I hope the appeal court decides Dunn is guilty of second degree murder as that appears to be the truth to me.

The Davis/Dunn case is a great example of how complicated our justice system can get. More importantly, its an example of how racist my country continues to be.

-Mister Ed