Inside Out Movie Review

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My wife agreed to go to see Inside Out with me after I begged (she usually doesn’t like animated movies).

As far as plot, there isn’t much to tell that isn’t in the trailers. The main character, a preteen girl named Riley, moves to a San Francisco with her parents and misses her old life in Minnesota.

Inside Riley’s head are five emotions that guide her life, Joy, Sadness, Fear, Anger, and Disgust.

The emotions guide what Riley does using a control panel in the headquarters of her brain. They try to align Riley’s actions with her core memories which define Riley’s interests, Friendship, Family, Hockey, Goofiness, and Honesty.

The move to a new state stresses Riley out which is symbolized by Joy, Sadness, and the five core memories being locked out of headquarters for a few days.

Riley is left without the parts of her personality that define her and she can’t feel happiness or sadness. Sounds an awful lot like how some people describe chronic depression, doesn’t it?

Inside Riley’s head Joy has to deal with how depressing Sadness is while finding their way back to headquarters.

The two of them experience a lot of fun explanations for why the human brain works the way it does.

Why do stupid commercial jingles stay stuck in your head? Because the janitors who manage memories send them to your headquarters as a prank.

Why do you remember some things, but not others? Because your emotions leave the memory.

That last one is actually true. It’s represented in the movie by the memories losing the color of the emotion that defines them.

The movie has a ton of cool visualizations of things. Riley’s mother has a set of five emotions running her head as well, but they clearly have Sadness as their leader. Riley’s dad is run by Anger.

The emotions have a control panel to interact with the world. Riley’s control panel is switched out for a larger one by the end of the movie with new buttons for puberty stuff. Her parents have even larger control panels with seats for the five emotions, emphasizing that the adults are set in the way the react to things.

Abstract thought is represented by a sort of abstract art gallery. Dreams are made by a cast of little creatures in the brain with scripts inspired by events from Riley’s day.

The end of the movie has a good moral, that all emotions are important, not just Joy; and that change isn’t always bad.

I’d recommend the movie to anyone who knows a little bit about how the human brain works. The description of emotions handling memories is visualized and explained in a pretty accurate manner and is enough fun on its own to warrant seeing the movie.

The story itself isn’t half bad either. It’s a kid’s story, but it’s Pixar! The always know how to pull at your emotions, espeically in a movie about emotions.

There’s also a good short before the movie called Lava. You could go for that or you could watch it on YouTube. It’s a nice little Hawaiian folk tale-esque love story.

So check Inside Out out if you like Pixar movies or the human brain (or love stories about volcanoes).

-GoCorral

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Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 12

Previous: Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 11

This post is all about the initial backlash the Dwarves suffer for the curse they laid upon the Bwarlor. The initial descriptions went into a lot of detail about the new subrace of Dwarves born from Human parents. I’ve removed as much as I could while attempting to preserve the core of the new culture within the timeline. Also, there’s some not nice words in this post, just to warn you.

I plan to write more about each race and subrace in the future. The information on the culture of the Bwaloran Dwarves will be moved out of the timeline and into that section.

346 NA: For many years Dwarf-sons were slaughtered by the Bwarlor, their deaths meant to purge the wombs of Bwarloran women. As the years passed the killings slowed and the Dwarf-sons found a place within Bwarloran society. A horrifying existence, forever a second class, beaten and abused by their own parents. Hatred grew in the hearts of these Dwarves, not for their abusers but for those who cursed them. Guided by the passion of the Humans and tempered by towering hatred for Dwarvenkind, the Bwarloran Dwarves formed an order, the Bastards of the Tattered Book.

The guiding mantra of the Bastards of the Tattered Book is, “We are bastards left on another’s door step.” Abandoned by the Metal Dwarves that cursed them they now intend to destroy the Metal Dwarves, tear up the Books of Prophecy, and become the true DWARF. They are the servant rebelling against their master, creation destroying their creators, sons killing their cruel fathers. They are the Bastards of the Tattered Book, and dammit, they mean business.

349 NA: The Merfolk took notice of the curse now that the first Bwarloran Dwarves had reached adulthood. The Merfolk offered to help ship the Dwarves born to the Humans to the Dwarven kingdom. The Bastards quickly rejected the notion that they wished to be reunited with their “original families.” The Merfolk seers, still unsatisfied, looked to Drolfo for guidance as to why this terrible curse had befallen the Bwarlor lands. Drolfo answered, “A curse from the Dwarves. You must attack the dwarves for there will be no peace with them.” The Merfolk began marshalling their armies.

352 NA: The race of Rana rose from the waters of Tonsil Lake. Some say that they are descended from the stars, riding gossamer strands of heavenly beauty. Amphibious and humanoid, they seem to radiate goodness. They settled in the Tonsil and frolicked, peaceful and happy, little aware of the chaos of the world.

360 NA: After many skirmishes the Landers took Cynelle. The Merfolk returned control of the city to the Najar. The Merfolk learned from this experience and gained advanced knowledge of how to fight inside cities.

366 NA: The Grez froze the Northern Sea to make one solid line of ice.

371 NA: The wraith people built a city in the middle of the New Ice, Ksilardyh.

-Mister Ed

Next: Gurutama Timeline Revising Part 13